TGIF Randoms: Key to a Long life is... Immaturity?

Looking for love in the New Year? Then circle this Sunday -- January 7th -- on your calendar. A bunch of dating sites, including Match and Plenty of Fish, expect this Sunday to be their busiest day of the year. In fact, Match.com thinks they’ll see a 42 percent spike in new people signing up to the site on January 7th. Why is this Sunday such a big online dating day? One reason is that it’s the first Sunday of the new year -- and Sundays are already a popular day for online dating.

According to Plenty of Fish spokesperson Kate MacLean, "The start of a fresh year symbolizes new beginnings, and singles may be feeling particularly excited and hopeful about the future. Also, after spending the holidays solo and/or with family, and being asked the dreaded question -- 'Why don’t you have a partner yet?' -- many singles start off the year armed with a resolution to find love." (Moneyish)  

                  

All they wanted for Christmas was a raise. A British survey asked workers to choose what they wanted for Christmas from their employers: 34 percent wanted a raise, 28 percent wanted a bonus, and 8 percent were hoping for a promotion. (The Ladders

                        

Millennials are perfectionists … According to a new study, Millennials are a lot harder on themselves than young adults of previous generations. Researchers studied more than 40,000 college students from the U.S., U.K. and Canada and found that the majority of them had something they called "multi-dimensional perfectionism" … or, perfectionism driven by unrealistically high expectations. According to researchers, this perfectionism could be a factor in the record high levels of mental health issues -- including anxiety, depression and eating disorders -- among Millennials. (NY Post)

                                      

So the key to a long and healthy life is … being immature. According to a study, feeling young, and even acting like a kid every now and then, is good for our health and well-being. Psychologist Dr. Meg Arroll says, "Perceiving ourselves as younger than our age is linked to a more future-orientated outlook, which means that we make better health choices such as engaging in exercise and healthy eating." Basically, act young if you want to feel young. (Metro

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