The Mask As a Symbol of Fear

RUSH: Don, Salinas, California, I'm glad you waited, sir. Welcome to the program. You're next to join me, the bummed out host today. Hello.

CALLER: Hi, Mr. Limbaugh. Let me first thank you for your courage and inspirational voice in this corona mess. I really appreciate it. And I would like to put this observation that I have. You know, the visual representation of how devastating this virus is never appeared. The truckloads of dead bodies never really happened. The overflowing hospitals with people dying on the sidewalks outside never really happened.

So now the curve is flattening and they're desperately looking for some way to show us how bad this disease is so all of a sudden it morphs from being a hand-to-mouth disease to the coronavirus is an aerial Ninja and you need to put a mask on when you leave your house to when you come back. And the main reason I can see for this is, it's the only visual they have of this virus being dangerous. And if you say, "I want my life back, please give me my job back," they'll say, "No, no. Can't you see? Everybody's wearing a mask. It's dangerous out there. It's dangerous."

RUSH: So let me make sure I understand it your theory. Your theory, the mask, everybody wearing masks is about the only sign they can make us use to create the impression that there's a silent, deadly killer out there.

CALLER: That's it, yes.

RUSH: And so everybody's gotta wear a mask. And, by the way, I have heard, I've seen members of the Drive-By Media, by the way, very supportive of the idea that the mask may become a permanent aspect of American public life.

CALLER: It's insane. If you remember at the very beginning it was wash your hands, don't touch your mouth. Then all of a sudden no, no, this thing will fly around corners and jump in your mouth and you'll die.

RUSH: Oh, yeah, we have videos of how it spreads across supermarket aisles when you're buying frozen peas.

CALLER: Yes. It's insane. But this is like the flailing of --

RUSH: How dare you laugh during this time of national -- you're laughing out there while this is happening. I can't believe you. I'm tempted to join you. No. I'm just kidding. I'm getting playful here to kind of dispute this notion that I'm bummed out today.

BREAK TRANSCRIPT

RUSH: I like that last caller's theory, the mask is the symbol of fear, the sign that you're at risk, the sign nothing is going to get better.

BREAK TRANSCRIPT

RUSH: A note from Mr. Snerdley: "Can you explain to me why TV people doing outdoor shots with nobody nearby are wearing masks? The cameraman's the only person nearby, and they can be over six feet away." I think it's precisely to create the image of fear.

They're wearing a mask because either they legitimately are afraid that that virus is lurking out there and it's racing through the air and targeting them or because, I tell you, how they've been ordered to behave by their boss. I mean, if the people that employ you tell you to wear a mask out there, that's what you're gonna do. I know CNN's not wearing a mask. Their people are not wearing masks.

Reporters in the pressroom where there is not six feet of separation, they may... (interruption) No, no, I know you mean reporters on the street. I'm talking about even in the pressroom as well, they're not wearing masks. But it is clear that the mask is a symbol of fear, and when you see various people suggesting that we may now have masks as part of our public lives for the rest of our lives? Uh, why?

Why?

What happened to the simple question of, "Why?" We've had pandemics before. We've had runaway viruses, and we've had highly contagious and virulent viruses. We've not done this. Look, I think it's useful.

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